Saturday, May 16, 2015

Shop Update || Knitted Accessories



I'm in the process of updating the shop with ready-to-wear knitted headbands, made from my original pattern the Urbanite Garland.  If you've been eyeing the pattern but are not a knitter, these are for you!

Perfect for keeping your hair out of your face on a windy day or seeking an effortless style when going out with friends, the Urbanite Garland is the ideal summer accessory. I created this design originally to get the utility of a bandana-- just dressed up a little... and I pretty much live in it on weekends. 

It features a wide band across the top of the head (about 8" wide) and tapers on the sides to a 3/4" band on the back. Subtle cable details accent the wider portion, while the thin part of the band has a more pronounced cabled or twisted appearance. The headband may be worn with the maximum width spread across the top of the head, or scrunched up a little for a different look. 

Originally just available as a knitting pattern, I'm excited to list the Urbanite Garland as a ready-made accessory, no knitting required!

Check out the available colors here - more to come soon.





Tuesday, May 12, 2015

52 Forms of Fungi || #48



Found in burned areas where morels are abundant, pink burn cup  (Tarzetta rosea) may cover the ground. While I'm sure I would be pretty jazzed about finding a ton of morels, these would probably grab my attention even more!  I would love to do a large installation with these - the color is so vibrant and they are very simple to make. 

This species was knitted as part of my 52 Forms of Fungi project.  See more forms for the project here.  




Monday, May 4, 2015

52 Forms of Fungi || #47



A couple of years ago, I was minding my own business in my office when a coworker walked in and tossed a baggie across my desk.  A little startled, I remember looking at it and thinking, "What on Earth?!" as I examined the strange crab claw-like structure before me.  For the most part, I'm the go-to "what-the-heck-is-going-on-with-my-tree?" lady, though I rarely get many questions about fungi, despite my obvious interest.  After a little digging, I discovered that the strange fungus that had sprouted up in my coworker's yard is yet another fascinating species of stinkhorn.  In looking into this unusual specimen I was inspired by stinky squid, which you see here, though I'm not sure exactly which stinkhorn my coworker had found, specifically.  The world of fungi never ceases to fascinate...

This species was knitted as part of my 52 Forms of Fungi project.  See more forms for the project here.  






Wednesday, April 29, 2015

52 Forms of Fungi || #46



Apricot jelly fungus has been on the list for quite a while and has finally made its debut!  It's really starting to hit home that this project is coming to a close - Of the several phases that Berroco provided yarn for, this was the last to create.  Imagining the curled, gelatinous structures of this fungus with each increase row, I continued to savor the softness of Ultra Alpaca Fine.  It's unlikely that this fiber will ever leave my list of favorite yarns.  I like how the natural curl of the yarn in a way mimics the shape of this species.  The Grove Mix colorway seemed to match up nicely as well. 

This species was knitted as part of my 52 Forms of Fungi project.  See more forms for the project here.  




Friday, April 17, 2015

Lichen of the Wichita Wildlife Refuge



Lichen is my favorite things to observe anywhere I go.  The Wichita Wildlife Refuge has a stunning array of lichen, and I'm always really drawn to the brightly colored crustose species covering the granite rock faces there.  So beautiful.  We went out and hiked for a day recently, and I spotted some beautiful foliose and fruticose lichens as well.  These are just some images of what I observed.  Happy Friday!










Wednesday, April 15, 2015

52 Forms of Fungi || #45



Craterellus fallax, black trumpet.  I find the dark color of these to be striking!  They are widely distributed, but apparently difficult to spot and like to grow beneath oaks through mycorrhizal relationships.  It seems that black trumpet is also very fragrant!  I'm not sure what they smell like, but how strange to spot a mushroom on a walk because of its olfactory properties!  

This species was knitted as part of my 52 Forms of Fungi project.  See more forms for the project here.  





Wednesday, March 11, 2015

52 Forms of Fungi || #44





Little nest polypore.  I remember observing some of these on a fallen branch in a natural area a year or so ago, alongside some bitchin' lichen.  They were much smaller than these polypores that I knitted, but the rings of color were pretty distinct.

These polypores were knitted for my project, 52 Forms of Fungi.  You can see more phases from this project here.

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